Credit Spreads: Ominous!

By: Bob Hoye | Fri, Jul 31, 2015
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The following is part of Pivotal Events that was published for our subscribers July 23, 2015.


 

Credit Markets

We have been plotting the path of US corporate credit spreads against the pattern that set up the dislocations in 1998 (LTCM), 2007 (Bear Stearns) and in 2008 (the crash).

A breakout to extended widening was accomplished earlier in the month. This was on track and within the same time in the three previous examples. Early July.

The next and more threatening breakout is scheduled for late in July.

We doubt that the Fed has this as number one on their list of bad things to prevent. Meanwhile, the FMOC has be going on--and on--about raising the administered rate, which has been a dangerous distraction. Hadn't thought much about this. Perhaps it's been considered as a symbol of the advent of central bank prudence, but market forces have not allowed them to increase the rate.

Previous Pivots included the charts for 1998 and 2007. Now it is time to include charts for 2008 and 2015, which follow.

The main issue is that credit spreads remain in the path to serious dislocation as exampled in 2008, 2007 and 1998. The killer reversal in spreads in 2000 was only one month from warning to the stock market peak.

We remain positive on the long bond. The initial target on the TLT has been 120. This week it has moved above the 50-Day ma at 118.22 and is at 119.45.

After the disaster ended in December, JNK enjoyed a vigorous rally from 36 to 39 in May. The latter part of the rally was seasonal and then it has accomplished the seasonal reversal.

Junk action is not good. The last rally to 38.38 failed at the 200-Day. At 37.74 today, it has taken out the March setback. Taking out the panic low of 36 would, well, be a panic. Spreads, as plotted by JNK/TLT, are threatening to slip below the 200-Day ma.

Today's action in credit markets is increasing the warning on the inevitable collapse of speculation.

Precious Metals

At major tops in this sector, we use momentum on the silver/gold ratio. The RSI on the ratio soared to 92 in 2011. The only other time it had been there was at the fateful peak in 1980.

The last "sell" from this indicator was a weak one in May of this year. In our November study, Caveat Venditor, we noted what was needed to determine an important bottom. This would be gold stocks beginning to outperform the bullion price and silver beginning to outperform gold. GDX outperforming the S&P would also be constructive.

These had their last up in May.

Still patiently holding large numbers of junior golds, this page would welcome a cyclical bottom and eventual recovery in the sector.

However, we have to play the hand we are dealt and it is comforting to know that within the next phase of the post-bubble contraction there will be times when the sector does very well.

After August, stock markets could suffer a concerning loss of liquidity, which may further depress precious metal stocks. However in magnificently grasping at straws, banks stocks sold off hard as the Tech-Bubble soared to the moon. Golds are being hit hard now.

What works for gold and gold stocks at severe lows is our Downside Capitulation model. This is registering Daily signals now and a Weekly signal would be associated with a cyclical bottom.

"As the touchstone tryeth gold, so gold tryeth men."


US Credit Spreads: 2008 Crash

US Credit Spreads: 2008 Crash


2007


2015

US Credit Spreads: 2015


Yield Curve and Bank Stocks

Yield Curve and Bank Stocks

 


Link to July 24 Bob Hoye interview on TalkDigitalNetwork.com: http://talkdigitalnetwork.com/2015/07/market-collapse-warning-signals-here/
Listen to the Bob Hoye Podcast every Friday afternoon at TalkDigitalNetwork.com

 


 

Bob Hoye

Author: Bob Hoye

Bob Hoye
Institutional Advisors

Bob Hoye

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