Climate Change Comment

By: Bob Hoye | Tue, May 24, 2016
Print Email

The May 12th piece on Sunspots reviewed that Solar Cycle 23 which ended in January 2008 accomplished the weakest minimum in over a hundred years. At its maximum in 2012, Cycle 24 was weaker. The drop with the April posting was rapid and set a new low.

Solar minimums have been associated with declining temperatures.

These have been longer-term events.

On the nearer term, El Niños are associated with warming and the one that ended last year was a strong one.

The following chart places it in perspective.


El Niño Changing to La Niña

Oceanic Nino Index
Larger Image

The opposite oscillation is called La Niñas and they have been associated with cooling.

This chart shows that the influence is declining quickly.

Upper-Ocean Heat Anomolies


Wrap

Both the Solar Cycle and the La Nina indicate cooling trends that are independent of any putative influence from increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide.


Benefits of Increasing CO2

That increasing concentrations of CO2 increases the temperature of the atmosphere and oceans has not been proven. On evidence over millions of years, changes in CO2 have followed those for the climate by some 400 to 800 years.

However, the record that increasing amounts of CO2 has been beneficial to life has been widely understood. Particularly since Priestley's work on gases in the 1770s.

One of the features of the Carboniferous Period was the extraordinary growth of plant life. It was driven by CO2 concentrations as high as 2500 parts per million. Today's commercial greenhouse operations use up to 1000 ppm CO2. Ontario's Ministry of Agriculture posts that the elevated level increases the rate of photosynthesis by some 50 percent over ambient concentrations.

Increasing ambient amounts of CO2 has prompted growth rates now detectable by satellite observation.


Benefits of Increasing Atmospheric CO2

Change in World Leaf Area 1982-2015

The overall balanced equation is...
6CO2 + 6H2O ------> C6H12O6 + 6O2

Sunlight energy

Where: CO2 = carbon dioxide
H2O = water
Light energy is required
C6H12O6 = glucose
O2 = oxygen

 


 

Bob Hoye

Author: Bob Hoye

Bob Hoye
Institutional Advisors

Bob Hoye

The opinions in this report are solely those of the author. The information herein was obtained from various sources; however we do not guarantee its accuracy or completeness. This research report is prepared for general circulation and is circulated for general information only. It does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and the particular needs of any specific person who may receive this report. Investors should seek financial advice regarding the appropriateness of investing in any securities or investment strategies discussed or recommended in this report and should understand that statements regarding future prospects may not be realized. Investors should note that income from such securities, if any, may fluctuate and that each security's price or value may rise or fall. Accordingly, investors may receive back less than originally invested. Past performance is not necessarily a guide to future performance.

Neither the information nor any opinion expressed constitutes an offer to buy or sell any securities or options or futures contracts. Foreign currency rates of exchange may adversely affect the value, price or income of any security or related investment mentioned in this report. In addition, investors in securities such as ADRs, whose values are influenced by the currency of the underlying security, effectively assume currency risk.

Moreover, from time to time, members of the Institutional Advisors team may be long or short positions discussed in our publications.

Copyright © 2003-2017 Bob Hoye

All Images, XHTML Renderings, and Source Code Copyright © Safehaven.com