• 257 days Will The ECB Continue To Hike Rates?
  • 258 days Forbes: Aramco Remains Largest Company In The Middle East
  • 259 days Caltech Scientists Succesfully Beam Back Solar Power From Space
  • 659 days Could Crypto Overtake Traditional Investment?
  • 664 days Americans Still Quitting Jobs At Record Pace
  • 666 days FinTech Startups Tapping VC Money for ‘Immigrant Banking’
  • 669 days Is The Dollar Too Strong?
  • 669 days Big Tech Disappoints Investors on Earnings Calls
  • 670 days Fear And Celebration On Twitter as Musk Takes The Reins
  • 672 days China Is Quietly Trying To Distance Itself From Russia
  • 672 days Tech and Internet Giants’ Earnings In Focus After Netflix’s Stinker
  • 676 days Crypto Investors Won Big In 2021
  • 676 days The ‘Metaverse’ Economy Could be Worth $13 Trillion By 2030
  • 677 days Food Prices Are Skyrocketing As Putin’s War Persists
  • 679 days Pentagon Resignations Illustrate Our ‘Commercial’ Defense Dilemma
  • 680 days US Banks Shrug off Nearly $15 Billion In Russian Write-Offs
  • 683 days Cannabis Stocks in Holding Pattern Despite Positive Momentum
  • 684 days Is Musk A Bastion Of Free Speech Or Will His Absolutist Stance Backfire?
  • 684 days Two ETFs That Could Hedge Against Extreme Market Volatility
  • 686 days Are NFTs About To Take Over Gaming?
Is The Bull Market On Its Last Legs?

Is The Bull Market On Its Last Legs?

This aging bull market may…

How Millennials Are Reshaping Real Estate

How Millennials Are Reshaping Real Estate

The real estate market is…

  1. Home
  2. Markets
  3. Other

Stanford's Taylor: US Debt Will Explode Without Changes

John Taylor, economics professor at Stanford University, spoke to Bloomberg Television's Trish Regan today and said that the U.S. "could get into a situation like Greece, quite frankly."

Taylor went on to say, "People have to realize it is a precarious situation. The debt is going to explode if we don't make some changes."

 

Courtesy of Bloomberg Television

 

Taylor on the U.S. economy:

"We have to get away from all these temporary things--rebates, monetary policy, quantitative easings, we have to get back to a strategy like we had in the 1980s--monetary policy and fiscal policy. I believe that will get the strong growth. The growth in the early 80s was 5.9% compared to 2.4% we've had in this recovery. There is a lot of evidence that that kind of policy works. Steady as you go, getting the tax rates down and keeping it there, not doing all of these temporary stimulations.

"We could get into a situation like Greece, quite frankly. People have to realize it is a precarious situation. The debt is going to explode if we don't make some changes. What seems to be more important is that people can get back on track, the country can get back on track, with just some sensible adjustments. I argue just bring spending back to where it was in 2007. That's not so long ago. We've had an enormous spending binge in the last few years. If we undo that binge, shouldn't be that hard, we can get back to some sensible pro-growth policies.

On whether the Fed's zero interest rate policy is helping to contribute to the deficit:

"I think it's contributing to the slow recovery because the Fed has bought so much of the debt that people don't know how they're going to undo that. They pledged to have interest rates at zero until 2014, but people are saying how can they possibly do that when the economy picks up. This uncertainty had lead people to sit on all this cash. I think if the Fed gets back to the policy that worked pretty well in the '80s and '90s, we would be in much better shape.

On Greece:

"A walk away would be a default. Nobody wants to do it at this point. The best thing is for the creditors to do as much as they can in conjunction with the Germans and the IMF is there too - to get a deal for Greece so that Greece can grow. Some of these GNP ideas are good, and that way, we get this behind us. They have been kicking the can down the road for years. That's a problem.

On whether credit holders are being unrealistic:

"It's a bargaining. Each side will try to get the best they can. The creditors are arguing that there is going to be contagion. If they don't do a better deal, the Greeks will argue and say hey, we're flat on our back, we have to get some growth. I think the Greeks have an issue here - if they can put in some good economic growth plans that get the economy moving and write down the debt even further. I think that that is the answer to this. It's really how Europe can get back on a growth track."

On U.S. entitlement programs:

"Right now, the entitlement spending is expected to grow way beyond something that anybody expects to be realistic. We just have to contain that growth. In other words, keep the spending from growing even further as a share to GDP. We do that in a way where we use the markets, the rule of law and incentives, it will be a better system. Some proposals out there to reform Medicare, Medicaid and keep spending down will lead to better health care. That is what we should be striving to do.

 

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment