• 11 hours Why Germany Is Going To War With Gold
  • 1 day Gold Is Still Cheap Compared To Stocks
  • 2 days Are Cryptocurrencies Funding Terrorism?
  • 3 days Promising Oil Companies To Watch In 2020
  • 3 days Could China's Coronavirus Outbreak Impact U.S. Stocks?
  • 4 days Tesla Stock Continues To Soar
  • 4 days What New Economic Data Reveals About Gold's Trajectory
  • 5 days The Lucrative New Tech Hijacking Your Privacy
  • 5 days The Biggest Loser In The China-U.S. Tariff Tit-For-Tat
  • 6 days Trade War Takes Its Toll On Shipping
  • 9 days Is $90 Oil Possible? An Interview With Jay Park
  • 9 days Billions Of Dollars Are Flooding Into The Flying Taxi Space
  • 10 days Is This The Most Important Energy Project Of 2020?
  • 10 days Startups Are Dying To Give You A Better Death
  • 11 days U.S. Restaurants Are Struggling With Rising Labor Costs
  • 11 days The Banking Bonanza Is Just Getting Started
  • 12 days How The Trade War Ceasefire Will Impact The Energy Industry
  • 12 days Who Is The Most Dangerous Person On The Internet?
  • 13 days SoftBank Sees First Quarterly Loss In 14 Years
  • 14 days Prepare For An Oil Glut In 2020
What's Behind The Global EV Sales Slowdown?

What's Behind The Global EV Sales Slowdown?

An economic slowdown in many…

Is The Bull Market On Its Last Legs?

Is The Bull Market On Its Last Legs?

This aging bull market may…

Another Retail Giant Bites The Dust

Another Retail Giant Bites The Dust

Forever 21 filed for Chapter…

  1. Home
  2. Markets
  3. Other

Bernanke: Don't Worry, China's $28 Trillion Debt is an "Internal Problem"

$28 Trillion "Internal Problem"

The blue ribbon award for ridiculous comment of the day goes to Ben Bernanke who dismissed China's $28 trillion debt pile as an "internal problem" only.

This revelation came from the Asian Financial Forum held in Hong Kong where Bernanke Downplayed China Impact on World Economy.

"I don't think China's economic slowdown is that severe to threaten the global economy," said Bernanke at the Asian Financial Forum held in Hong Kong.

Bernanke argued that the global economy was more troubled by a global savings glut, which had long been a drag on investments.

Bernanke also said the $28 trillion debt pile facing China was an "internal" problem, given the majority of the borrowings was issued in local currency. According to consultancy McKinsey & Co., government, corporate, and household debt in China had already hit 282% of the country's gross domestic product as of mid-2014.

Bernanke said the correlation between different markets is higher than that between markets and the economy. He pointed out that worldwide market selloffs in times of distress was natural due to global asset allocations. "The U.S. and China are not as closely tied as the market thinks," Bernanke said.

Contrary to Bernanke's views on the global impact of a Chinese slowdown, the IMF said in its latest World Economic Outlook Update released on Tuesday that "a sharper-than expected slowdown in China" was a significant risk that would bring "international spillovers through trade, commodity prices, and waning confidence."


Savings Glut Question

Actually, I have to ask: Which is more ridiculous: Dismissing $28 trillion debt as an "internal problem" or proposing $28 trillion debt is indicative of a "savings glut"?

 

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment