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Bernanke: Don't Worry, China's $28 Trillion Debt is an "Internal Problem"

$28 Trillion "Internal Problem"

The blue ribbon award for ridiculous comment of the day goes to Ben Bernanke who dismissed China's $28 trillion debt pile as an "internal problem" only.

This revelation came from the Asian Financial Forum held in Hong Kong where Bernanke Downplayed China Impact on World Economy.

"I don't think China's economic slowdown is that severe to threaten the global economy," said Bernanke at the Asian Financial Forum held in Hong Kong.

Bernanke argued that the global economy was more troubled by a global savings glut, which had long been a drag on investments.

Bernanke also said the $28 trillion debt pile facing China was an "internal" problem, given the majority of the borrowings was issued in local currency. According to consultancy McKinsey & Co., government, corporate, and household debt in China had already hit 282% of the country's gross domestic product as of mid-2014.

Bernanke said the correlation between different markets is higher than that between markets and the economy. He pointed out that worldwide market selloffs in times of distress was natural due to global asset allocations. "The U.S. and China are not as closely tied as the market thinks," Bernanke said.

Contrary to Bernanke's views on the global impact of a Chinese slowdown, the IMF said in its latest World Economic Outlook Update released on Tuesday that "a sharper-than expected slowdown in China" was a significant risk that would bring "international spillovers through trade, commodity prices, and waning confidence."


Savings Glut Question

Actually, I have to ask: Which is more ridiculous: Dismissing $28 trillion debt as an "internal problem" or proposing $28 trillion debt is indicative of a "savings glut"?

 

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