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Need a Jedi to Blow Up the R-Star

I haven't written an article for a couple of weeks. This is not entirely unusual: I have written this commentary, in some form, since about 1996 and there are occasional breaks in the series. It happens for several reasons. Sometimes it is simple ennui, as writing an analysis/opinion article for twenty years can occasionally get boring especially when markets are listless as they frequently are in August. Other times, it is because work - the real work, the stuff we get paid for - is too consuming and I have not time or energy left to write  a few hundred words of readable prose. Maybe that's part of the reason here, since the number of inflation-investing-related inquiries has definitely increased recently, along with some new client flows (and not to mention that we are raising capital for Enduring Investments through a 506(c) offering - you can find details on Crowdfunder or contact me through our website). Finally, in recent years as the ability to track the number of clicks/eyeballs on my writing has improved, I've simply written less during those times...such as August...when I know that not many people will read the writing.

But this time is a little different. While some of those excuses apply in some measure, I've actually skipped writing over the last two weeks because there is too much to say. (Fortunately, I said some of it on two Bloomberg TV appearances, which you can see here and here.)

Well, my list of notes is not going to go away on its own so I am going to have to tackle some of them or throw them away. Unfortunately, a lot of them have to do with the inane nattering coming out of Federal Reserve mouthpieces. Let's start today with the publication that gathered a lot of ink a couple of weeks ago: San Francisco Fed President John Williams' FRBSF Economic Letter called "Monetary Policy in a Low R-star World."

The conclusion that Williams reached was sensational, especially since it resonates with the "low return world" meme. Williams concluded that "The time has come to critically reassess prevailing policy frameworks and consider adjustments to handle new challenges, specifically those related to a low natural real rate of interest." This article was grating from the first paragraph, where Williams casts the Federal Reserve as the explorer/hero:

"As nature abhors a vacuum, so monetary policy abhors stasis. Instead of being a rigid set of precepts, it follows the adage, that which survives is that which is most adaptive to change... In the wake of the global financial crisis, monetary policy has continued to evolve... As we move forward, economic conditions require that central banks and governments throughout the world carefully reexamine their policy frameworks and consider further adjustments in terms of monetary policy strategy—both in its own right and as it relates to other policy arenas—to successfully navigate these new seas."

One might give the Federal Reserve more credit if subsequent evolutions of policy prescriptions were not getting progressively worse rather than better. Constructive change first requires critical evaluation of the shortcomings of current policy, doesn't it?

Williams carries on to argue that the natural rate of interest (R-star) is lower now than it has been in the past. Now, Fed watchers should note that if true, this implies that current monetary policy is not as loose as has been believed. This is a useful conclusion for the Fed, since it would explain - within their existing model framework - why exceptionally low rates have not triggered better growth; it also would allow the Fed to raise rates more slowly than otherwise. I've pointed out before the frustrating tendency of groupthinking economists to attribute persistent poor model predictions to calibration issues rather than specification issues. This is exactly what Williams is doing. He's saying "there's nothing wrong with our model! If we had simply known that the natural rate was lower, we would have understood that we weren't as stimulative as we thought." Possible, but it might also be that the whole model sucks, and that the monetarists are right when they say that monetary policy doesn't move real variables very well. That's a hypothesis that at least bears examining, but I haven't seen any fancy Fed papers on it.

What is really remarkable is that the rest of the paper is largely circular, and yet no one seems to mind. Williams attributes the current low r-star to several factors, including "a more general global savings glut." Note that his estimates of r-star take a sharp turn lower in 2008-9 (see chart below, source FRBSF Economic Letter, figure 1).

Selected Country Growth rates since 1980

Wow, I wonder what could have caused an increase in the global savings glut starting in 2008? Could it be because the world's central banks persistently added far more liquidity than was needed for the proper functioning of the economy, leading to huge excess reserves - aka a savings glut?

So, according to Williams, the neutral interest rate is lower at least in part because...central banks added a lot of liquidity. Kind of circular, ain't it?

Since according to Williams this fact explains "uncomfortably low inflation and growth despite very low interest rates," it must mean he is bravely taking responsibility - since, after all, quantitative easing caused the global savings glut which, in his construct, caused low growth and inflation. Except that I don't think that's what he wants us to conclude.

This isn't research - it's a recognition that what they did didn't work, so they are backfilling to try and find an excuse for why their theories are still good. To the Fed, it is just that something happened they didn't realize and take account of. Williams wants to be able to claim "see, we didn't get growth because we weren't as stimulative as we thought we were," because then they can use their old theories to explain how moving rates around is really important...even though it didn't work this time. But the problem is that low rates don't cause growth. The model is wrong. And no amount of calibration can fix a mis-specified model.

 


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Enduring Investments is a registered investment adviser that specializes in solving inflation-related problems. Fill out the contact form at http://www.EnduringInvestments.com/contact and we will send you our latest Quarterly Inflation Outlook. And if you make sure to put your physical mailing address in the "comment" section of the contact form, we will also send you a copy of Michael Ashton's book "Maestro, My Ass!"

 

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