• 7 hours 3 Restaurant Stocks In Full Recovery Mode
  • 15 hours Bitcoin Is Driven By Testosterone
  • 5 days Quantum Computing Is The Newest Megatrend In Silicon Valley
  • 7 days How To Invest In The Cybersecurity Boom
  • 8 days Investors Are Patient With Unprofitable Giants
  • 10 days Wells Fargo Back In The Scandal Spotlight Once Again
  • 12 days 5 Stocks To Keep A Close Eye On This Year
  • 14 days As Auto Giants Flail, Look To Chip Stocks For Gains
  • 14 days Central America Is Ready For The Bitcoin Hustle
  • 16 days China’s Video Game Restrictions Unlikely To Slow Down Booming Industry
  • 17 days Top Performing Stocks As Inflation Fears Grow
  • 18 days US Airline Stocks Take A Beating On New EU Restrictions
  • 19 days This IPO Could Open Sustainable Fashion Floodgates
  • 20 days Crypto Crime Nets Another $2B Fraudster
  • 22 days This Week’s Hottest Meme Stocks
  • 24 days Why World Markets Should Be Watching Germany Closely
  • 26 days Could ‘Cultured’ Meat Rival The Plant-Based Megatrend?
  • 28 days ‘Easy Money’: Crypto Is Still Attracting Newbie Investors
  • 30 days Foreign Syndicates May Have Stolen Up To $400B In COVID Benefits
  • 31 days Gold Jumps Above $1800 Ahead Of Jackson Hole Summit
Keith Weiner

Keith Weiner

Keith is founder of the Gold Standard Institute USA in Phoenix, Arizona, and CEO of precious metals fund manager Monetary Metals. He created DiamondWare, a…

Contact Author

  1. Home
  2. Markets
  3. Other

Introducing Yield Purchasing Power

The monetary debate seems artificially limited. On one side is Federal Reserve policy based on discretion. On the other is policy based on rules. It's Keynes vs. Friedman. It's central planning of our economy based on the reactive whims of wise monetary planners vs. central planning of our economy based on the proactive rules written by … wise monetary planners.

On the rules side, there is a sub-debate. Should we have central planning based on unemployment and the Consumer Price Index (as now) or switch to central planning based on another metric such as GDP?

Whether one is on team Keynes or team Friedman, whether one is on sub-team Friedman CPI or Friedman GDP, everyone seems to take something for granted. That is, the quantity theory of money. If the quantity rises, then prices follow. However, since prices (especially commodity prices) are not really rising, this would seem to give more leeway to the monetary planners, to inflict more monetary policy on us.

There is something about this which few acknowledge. To increase the quantity of dollars -- which is not money, but that's a whole 'nother discussion -- the Federal Reserve buys bonds. Whatever effect this may have on the price of a new Chevy, it obviously affects the price of the Treasury bond. It pushes the bond price up. Since the interest rate is a strict mathematical inverse of the bond price, we have an obvious conclusion.

The Fed is pushing down the rate of interest.

We can say that the interest rate is the collateral damage. The Keynesians and Friedmanites, in their zeal to increase the quantity of dollars, support or at least ignore the falling interest rate. OK, but who cares about the interest rate? You should care. Everyone is impacted by the 35-year global trend of falling interest rates.

The falling rate ushers in a kind of hyperinflation. You won't see it by looking at prices, or purchasing power. If you look at the value of your portfolio and divide by the cost of living, you may be lulled into a false sense of security.

You will see the hyperinflation, if you look at it another way. Instead of the liquidation price of assets, consider the yield on assets. Instead of selling off the family farm to buy groceries, think of operating that farm to grow food. Can you live on the crops you produce? Or must you liquidate piece of it, just to survive?

The same question applies to any capital asset including a bank balance. Is it possible to live on the interest?

In the cold harsh light of yield purchasing power, we can see the erosion of our capital base. Since civilization itself depends on capital accumulation, this erosion is a retrogressive force dragging us back to another dark age.

I gave a 45-minute presentation on Yield Purchasing Power at American Institute for Economic Research in Great Barrington, MA on October 14, 2016. I am grateful to the Institute for recording video of my presentation plus extended Q&A. The video is here.

 

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment