• 11 hours Can Twitter Sway Economic Policy?
  • 14 hours Widespread Power Outages Hit New York City
  • 17 hours Equifax To Pay $700 Million To Settle Data Breach Case
  • 19 hours Netflix Struggles To Rebound After Subscriber Hit
  • 2 days $15,000 For Your Crypto’s Ticket To Visibility
  • 3 days The Next Fashion Frontier
  • 4 days What Is Africa’s Role In The New Silk Road?
  • 4 days Trump Was Right About The Dollar
  • 5 days Is Silver Gearing Up For A Rally?
  • 5 days World’s Largest Hedge Fund Turns Bullish On Gold
  • 5 days It’s Time To Spend More On Clean Energy R&D
  • 5 days Contrarian Investors Are Beating The Stock Market
  • 6 days Bulgaria’s Revenue Agency Falls Victim To Biggest Cyber Heist In History
  • 6 days Amazon Faces European Union Anti-Trust Probe
  • 6 days Commodities Are Having A Stellar Year
  • 6 days Bezos’ Next Big Project Could Be Worth $100 Billion Per Year
  • 7 days 3,600 Years Later, Climate Change Turns Mammoths Into $40M Market
  • 7 days Tesla, Apple Claim China Is Stealing Intellectual Property
  • 7 days EV Giants Duke It Out For Battery Dominance
  • 7 days Tech Billionaire Takes Aim At Google
Billionaires Are Pushing Art To New Limits

Billionaires Are Pushing Art To New Limits

Welcome to Art Basel: The…

The Problem With Modern Monetary Theory

The Problem With Modern Monetary Theory

Modern monetary theory has been…

  1. Home
  2. Markets
  3. Other

Tariffs are Good for Inflation

The news of the day today - at least, from the standpoint of someone interested in inflation and inflation markets - was President Trump's announcement of a new tariff on Canadian lumber. The new tariff, which is a response to Canada's "alleged" subsidization of sales of lumber to the US ("alleged," even though it is common knowledge that this occurs and has occurred for many years), ran from 3% to 24% on specific companies where the US had information on the precise

In related news, lumber is an important input to homebuilding. Several home price indicators were out today: the FHA House Price Index for new purchases was up 6.43% y/y, the highest level in a while (see chart, source Bloomberg).

US House Price Index

The Case-Shiller home price index, which is a better index than the FHA index, showed the same thing (see chart, source Bloomberg). The first bump in home price growth, in 2012 and 2013, was due to a rebound to the sharp drop in home prices during the credit crisis. But this latest turn higher cannot be due to the same factor, since home prices have nearly regained all the ground that they lost in 2007-2012.

Case-Shiller 20-City Composite

Those price increases are in the prices of existing homes, of course, but I wanted to illustrate that, even without new increases in materials costs, housing costs were continuing to rise faster than incomes and faster than prices generally. But now, the price of new homes will also rise due to this tariff (unless the market is slack and so builders have to absorb the cost increase, which seems unlikely to happen). Thus, any ebbing in core inflation that we may have been expecting as home price inflation leveled off may be delayed somewhat longer.

But the tariff hike is symptomatic of a policy that provokes deeper concern among market participants. As I've pointed out previously, de-globalization (aka protectionism) is a significant threat to inflation not just in the United States, but around the world. While I am not worried that most of Trump's proposals would result in a "reflationary trade" due to strong growth - I am not convinced we have solved the demographic and productivity challenges that keep growth from being strong by prior standards, and anyway growth doesn't cause inflation - I am very concerned that arresting globalization will. This isn't all Trump's fault; he is also a symptom of a sense among workers around the world that globalization may have gone too far, and with no one around who can eloquently extol the virtues of free trade, tensions were likely to rise no matter who occupied the White House. But he is certainly

Not only do inflation markets understand this, it is right now one of the most-significant things affecting levels in inflation markets. Consider the chart below, which compares 10-year breakeven inflation (the difference between 10-year Treasuries and 10-year TIPS) to the frequency of "Border Adjustment "as a search term in news stories on Google.

10-Year Breakevens

The market clearly anticipated the Trumpflation issue, but as the concern about BAT declined so did breakevens. Until today, when 10-year breakevens jumped 5-6bps on the Canadian tariff story.

At roughly 2%, breakevens appear to be discounting an expectation that the Fed will fail to achieve its price inflation target of 2% on PCE (which would be about 2.25% on CPI), and also excluding the value of any "tail outcomes" from protectionist battles. When growth flags, I expect breakevens will as well - and they are of course not as cheap as they were last year (by some 60-70bps). But from a purely clinical perspective, it is still hard to see how TIPS can be perceived as terribly rich here, at least relative to nominal Treasury bonds.

 


P.S. Don't forget to buy my book! What's Wrong with Money: The Biggest Bubble of All. Thanks!

You can follow me @inflation_guy!

Enduring Investments is a registered investment adviser that specializes in solving inflation-related problems. Fill out the contact form at http://www.EnduringInvestments.com/contact and we will send you our latest Quarterly Inflation Outlook. And if you make sure to put your physical mailing address in the "comment" section of the contact form, we will also send you a copy of Michael Ashton's book "Maestro, My Ass!"

 

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment