• 4 hours What New Economic Data Reveals About Gold's Trajectory
  • 1 day The Lucrative New Tech Hijacking Your Privacy
  • 1 day The Biggest Loser In The China-U.S. Tariff Tit-For-Tat
  • 2 days Trade War Takes Its Toll On Shipping
  • 4 days Is $90 Oil Possible? An Interview With Jay Park
  • 5 days Billions Of Dollars Are Flooding Into The Flying Taxi Space
  • 5 days Is This The Most Important Energy Project Of 2020?
  • 6 days Startups Are Dying To Give You A Better Death
  • 6 days U.S. Restaurants Are Struggling With Rising Labor Costs
  • 7 days The Banking Bonanza Is Just Getting Started
  • 7 days How The Trade War Ceasefire Will Impact The Energy Industry
  • 8 days Who Is The Most Dangerous Person On The Internet?
  • 8 days SoftBank Sees First Quarterly Loss In 14 Years
  • 10 days Prepare For An Oil Glut In 2020
  • 11 days Why A Strong Yuan Is A Promising Sign For The Trade War
  • 12 days What Would You Sacrifice For A Debt-Free Life?
  • 12 days Shareholders Urge Major Bank To Stop Funding Fossil Fuel Companies
  • 12 days Tariffs Are Causing A Slowdown In U.S. Manufacturing
  • 13 days The Great Silicon Valley Migration Has Begun
  • 13 days 3 Oil Stocks Paying Out Promising Dividends In 2020
Mining.com

Mining.com

Mining.com

MINING.com is a web-based global mining publication focusing on news and commentary about mining and mineral exploration. The site is a one-stop-shop for mining industry…

Contact Author

  1. Home
  2. News
  3. Breaking News

Chile Cracks Down On Environmental Infractions

Mining

Chilean President Sebastian Piñera has submitted a series of modifications to a bill introduced earlier this year, which would set stiffer fines and jail time for serious violations of the country’s environmental rules.

The proposed law would make it a crime to mislead environmental inspectors or to obstruct the enforcement of environmental regulations in the world’s top copper producing country.

As part of the amendments, the government has tripled the related fines to up to $215,000 from a previous top of $70,000 and defined the scope of what would be considered environmental damage.

Jail time has been kept at a maximum of two months.

The new law would also empower local and regional authorities to more closely supervise mitigation efforts of projects that have the potential to pose serious environmental threats.

Most environmental crimes in Chile are currently handled by civil or environmental tribunals, or through out-of-court settlements with regulators.

The ex-prosecutor for the Ministry of the Environment, Jorge Cash, said that while the changes point in the right direction, they only apply to companies and not to its top executives. Related: China Weighs Rare Earth Export Ban

“The proposed law lacks of means to attribute criminal responsibility to managers,” Cash told local newspaper La Tercera. “Without that, the most affected executives with be the middlemen, not the decision makers.”

Chile has a history of imposing hefty fines to miners that breach environmental regulations. In 2015, the Superintendence of the Environment (SMA) ordered Lumina Copper to pay $11.9 million for infractions to the provisions established in its mining permit, including failure to implement mitigation measures to prevent the contamination of underground water supplies 

At the time, it was the second-highest fine the SMA had imposed since it was created in 2012.

The largest penalty until then — $16 million — was issued in 2013 to Barrick Gold’s (TSX:ABX) (NYSE:GOLD) now shelved Pascua Lama gold and silver mine.

The amended initiative would need to pass both chambers of Chile’s Congress before becoming law.

By Mining.com

More Top Reads From Safehaven.com:

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment