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A Payrolls Report that Matters Again

Tomorrow's Employment Report offers something it hasn't offered in a very long time: the chance to actually influence the course of monetary policy, and therefore markets.

Now that the taper has started, its continuation and/or acceleration is very "data dependent." While many members of the FOMC are expecting for the taper to be completely finished by the middle of this year (according to the minutes released yesterday), investors understand that view is contingent on continued growth and improvement. This is the first Payrolls number in a very long time that could plausibly influence ones' view of the likely near-term course of policy.

I don't think that, in general, investors should pay much attention to this report in December or in January. There is far too much noise, and the seasonal adjustments are much larger than the net underlying change in jobs. Accordingly, your opinion of whether the number is "high" or "low" is really an opinion about whether the seasonal adjustment factors were "low" or "high." Yes, there is a science to this but what we also know from science is that the rejection of a null hypothesis gets very difficult as the standard deviation around the supposed mean increases. And, for this number and next months' number, the standard deviation is very high.

That will not prevent markets from trading on the basis of whatever number is reported by the BLS tomorrow. Especially in fixed-income, a figure away from consensus (197k on Payrolls, 7.0% on the Unemployment Rate will likely provoke a big trade. On a strong figure, especially coupled with a decline in the Unemployment Rate below 7%, you can expect bonds to take an absolute hiding. And, although it's less clear with equities because of the lingering positive momentum from December, I'd expect the same for stocks - a strong number implies the possibility of a quicker taper, less liquidity, and for some investors that will be sufficient sign that it's time to head for the hills.

I think a "weak" number will help fixed-income, and probably quite a lot, but I am less sure how positive it will be for the equity market.

In any event, welcome back to volatility.

Meanwhile, with commodities in full flight, inflation breakevens are shooting higher. Some of this is merely seasonal - over the last 10 years, January has easily been the best month for breakevens with increases in the 10-year breakeven in 7 of the 10 years with an overall average gain of 15bps - and some of it is due to the reduction of bad carry as December and January roll away, making TIPS relatively more attractive. Ten-year breakevens have risen about 18bps over the last month, which is not inconsistent with the size of those two effects. Still, as the chart below (Source: Bloomberg) shows, 10-year breakevens are back to the highest level since before the summer shellacking.

USGGBE10 Index Chart
Larger Image

Indeed, according to a private metric we follow, TIPS are now back almost to fair value (they only very rarely get absolutely rich) compared to nominal bonds. This means that the benefit from being long breakevens at this level solely consists of the value that comes from the market's mis-evaluating the likelihood of increasing inflation rather than decreasing inflation - that is, a speculation - and no longer gets a "following wind" from the fact that TIPS themselves were cheap outright. I still prefer TIPS to nominal Treasuries, but that's because I think inflation metrics will increase from here and, along with those metrics, interest in inflation products will recover and push breakevens higher again.


You can follow me @inflation_guy!

Enduring Investments is a registered investment adviser that specializes in solving inflation-related problems. Fill out the contact form at http://www.EnduringInvestments.com/contact and we will send you our latest Quarterly Inflation Outlook. And if you make sure to put your physical mailing address in the "comment" section of the contact form, we will also send you a copy of Michael Ashton's book "Maestro, My Ass!"


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