• 2 days Investors Are Patient With Unprofitable Giants
  • 4 days Wells Fargo Back In The Scandal Spotlight Once Again
  • 6 days 5 Stocks To Keep A Close Eye On This Year
  • 7 days As Auto Giants Flail, Look To Chip Stocks For Gains
  • 8 days Central America Is Ready For The Bitcoin Hustle
  • 10 days China’s Video Game Restrictions Unlikely To Slow Down Booming Industry
  • 11 days Top Performing Stocks As Inflation Fears Grow
  • 12 days US Airline Stocks Take A Beating On New EU Restrictions
  • 13 days This IPO Could Open Sustainable Fashion Floodgates
  • 14 days Crypto Crime Nets Another $2B Fraudster
  • 16 days This Week’s Hottest Meme Stocks
  • 17 days Why World Markets Should Be Watching Germany Closely
  • 19 days Could ‘Cultured’ Meat Rival The Plant-Based Megatrend?
  • 22 days ‘Easy Money’: Crypto Is Still Attracting Newbie Investors
  • 23 days Foreign Syndicates May Have Stolen Up To $400B In COVID Benefits
  • 24 days Gold Jumps Above $1800 Ahead Of Jackson Hole Summit
  • 25 days International Banks Blacklist Afghanistan Following Taliban Takeover
  • 26 days China’s Tycoons Are Getting A Serious Reality Check
  • 27 days U.S. Cannabis Space Heats Up With Telling Tilray Acquisition
  • 28 days Consumer Price Index Hits 13-Year-High
  1. Home
  2. Markets
  3. Other

Personal Income Up 0.3 Percent, Real Disposable Income Not Quite 0.1 Percent

The BEA's Personal Income and Outlays report shows personal incomes rose 0.3%.

"Real DPI increased less than 0.1 percent in September and Real PCE increased 0.3 percent."

Spending rose 0.5% but the BEA revised August from +0.0% to -0.1% so effectively spending increased 0.4% from the unrevised number.

Income and Price Indices


Econoday Consensus

The reported numbers were mostly in-line with the Econoday Consensus Estimates.

Personal Income and Outlays


Real Disposable Personal Income Year-Over-Year

Real Disposable Personal Income Year-Over-Year

Econoday calls the report "solid" but sees the inflation data as "mixed to soft".

The Econoday parrot is always happy when consumers have less real money to spend. The above chart simply is too "soft".

The parrot would have been happier had inflation advanced more and consumers effectively made nothing.

 

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment