• 11 hours Can Twitter Sway Economic Policy?
  • 14 hours Widespread Power Outages Hit New York City
  • 17 hours Equifax To Pay $700 Million To Settle Data Breach Case
  • 19 hours Netflix Struggles To Rebound After Subscriber Hit
  • 2 days $15,000 For Your Crypto’s Ticket To Visibility
  • 3 days The Next Fashion Frontier
  • 4 days What Is Africa’s Role In The New Silk Road?
  • 4 days Trump Was Right About The Dollar
  • 5 days Is Silver Gearing Up For A Rally?
  • 5 days World’s Largest Hedge Fund Turns Bullish On Gold
  • 5 days It’s Time To Spend More On Clean Energy R&D
  • 5 days Contrarian Investors Are Beating The Stock Market
  • 6 days Bulgaria’s Revenue Agency Falls Victim To Biggest Cyber Heist In History
  • 6 days Amazon Faces European Union Anti-Trust Probe
  • 6 days Commodities Are Having A Stellar Year
  • 6 days Bezos’ Next Big Project Could Be Worth $100 Billion Per Year
  • 7 days 3,600 Years Later, Climate Change Turns Mammoths Into $40M Market
  • 7 days Tesla, Apple Claim China Is Stealing Intellectual Property
  • 7 days EV Giants Duke It Out For Battery Dominance
  • 7 days Tech Billionaire Takes Aim At Google
Billionaires Are Pushing Art To New Limits

Billionaires Are Pushing Art To New Limits

Welcome to Art Basel: The…

The Problem With Modern Monetary Theory

The Problem With Modern Monetary Theory

Modern monetary theory has been…

Michael Pento

Michael Pento

Delta Global

With more than 16 years of industry experience, Michael Pento acts as chief economist for Delta Global Advisors and is a contributing writer for GreenFaucet.com.…

Contact Author

  1. Home
  2. Markets
  3. Other

Raise the Inflation Target and Put a Date on It!

Raise the Inflation Target and Put a Date on It! That’s the direction some high-profile economist and former members on the FOMC want to go. According to these academics, including Narayana Kocherlakota the former president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis from 2009 to 2015, raising the inflation target just isn’t enough. They want to put a time horizon on it as well. In other words, they want to raise the inflation target higher than the current 2% level, and then place a firm date as to when that inflation goal must be achieved.

Their rational for doing both actions is to reduce the level of real interest rates, which they somehow believe is the progenitor for viable GDP growth. You see, once the Fed has taken the nominal Fed Funds Rate to zero, there isn’t much more room to the downside unless these money manipulators assent to negative nominal interest rates. But charging banks to hold excess reserves is fraught with danger, and so far this idea has been eschewed in this country and has been proven ineffectual in Europe.

The Fed wants the flexibility to make real interest rates more negative than the minus 2% that would be achieved at the zero-bound rate when using the current 2% inflation target.

The next recession could be just around the corner and the Fed is thinking about ways to stimulate the economy given the fact that the amount of ammunition--the number of rate cuts until the F.F.R. hits zero percent--is extremely limited. With very little leeway available to reduce borrowing costs, these mainstream academics want to facilitate more negative real interest rates by ensuring inflation is higher right from the start.

The math is simple: a three percent (or higher) inflation rate would equate to at least a minus three percent real F.F.R. once the nominal rate hit zero. But as to why these Keynesian academics are so convinced a lower real interest rate is better for economic growth is never clearly explained. Probably because it is a nonsensical tenet and the biggest fallacy in all of central bank group think. Their spurious logic dictates that a lower unemployment rate is the primary cause of rising rates of inflation and that a higher rate of inflation is supportive for lowering the unemployment rate. Exactly how this simple model arrives at that conclusion is never cogently explained; other than the mistaken belief that inflation and growth are synonymous terms.

But history and genuine economics clearly illustrate that inflation does not bring about growth, nor does it necessarily lower the unemployment rate. In fact, a rising rate of inflation often leads to higher rates of unemployment. This is the exact opposite of the Phillips Curve dogma held at the Fed, which dictates that a falling unemployment rate is the totality of inflation.

By Michael Pento

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment