• 267 days Could Crypto Overtake Traditional Investment?
  • 272 days Americans Still Quitting Jobs At Record Pace
  • 273 days FinTech Startups Tapping VC Money for ‘Immigrant Banking’
  • 277 days Is The Dollar Too Strong?
  • 277 days Big Tech Disappoints Investors on Earnings Calls
  • 278 days Fear And Celebration On Twitter as Musk Takes The Reins
  • 279 days China Is Quietly Trying To Distance Itself From Russia
  • 280 days Tech and Internet Giants’ Earnings In Focus After Netflix’s Stinker
  • 284 days Crypto Investors Won Big In 2021
  • 284 days The ‘Metaverse’ Economy Could be Worth $13 Trillion By 2030
  • 285 days Food Prices Are Skyrocketing As Putin’s War Persists
  • 287 days Pentagon Resignations Illustrate Our ‘Commercial’ Defense Dilemma
  • 287 days US Banks Shrug off Nearly $15 Billion In Russian Write-Offs
  • 291 days Cannabis Stocks in Holding Pattern Despite Positive Momentum
  • 292 days Is Musk A Bastion Of Free Speech Or Will His Absolutist Stance Backfire?
  • 292 days Two ETFs That Could Hedge Against Extreme Market Volatility
  • 294 days Are NFTs About To Take Over Gaming?
  • 294 days Europe’s Economy Is On The Brink As Putin’s War Escalates
  • 298 days What’s Causing Inflation In The United States?
  • 299 days Intel Joins Russian Exodus as Chip Shortage Digs In
  1. Home
  2. News
  3. Breaking News

Copper Could Help Recycle Carbon Dioxide

Copper

Researchers at Brown University have found a way to fine-tune a copper catalyst to efficiently produce complex hydrocarbons — known as C2-plus products — from CO2.

In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, the scientists report that the catalyst can produce C2-plus compounds with up to 72% faradaic efficiency. According to them, this is far better than previously reported efficiencies of other catalysts for C2-plus reactions.

They also report that the preparation process can be scaled up to an industrial level fairly easily, which gives the new catalyst potential for use in large-scale CO2 recycling efforts.

“There had been reports in the literature of all kinds of different treatments for copper that could produce these C2-plus with a range of different efficiencies,” said Tayhas Palmore, a professor of engineering who co-authored the paper with Ph.D. student Taehee Kim. “What Taehee did was a set of experiments to unravel what each of these treatment steps was actually doing to the catalyst in terms of reactivity, which pointed the way to optimizing a catalyst for these multi-carbon compounds.”

Based on previous studies, Kim experimented with a variety of halogenation methods, as this process that coats a copper surface with atoms of chlorine, bromine or iodine in the presence of an electrical potential could increase a catalyst’s selectivity of C2-plus products. After much testing, he zeroed in on which halogen elements and which electrical potentials yielded catalysts with the best performance in CO2-to-C2-plus reactions. He found that the optimal preparations could yield faradaic efficiencies of between 70.7% and 72.6%, far higher than any other copper catalyst.

The researchers say that, ultimately, such a catalyst could aid in large-scale recycling of CO2, for example, at mine sites, power plants and other industrial facilities, to then convert it into other useful carbon compounds. 

By Mining.com 

More Top Reads From Safehaven.com:

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment