• 9 hours Americans Are Counting On Another COVID Stimulus Check
  • 16 hours What's Next For Hong Kong?
  • 1 day Bitcoin Fails To Stay Above $10,000
  • 2 days Bill Gates And Big Oil Chase The Dream Of Nuclear Fusion
  • 2 days Top Jeweler To Use Only Recycled Gold And Silver
  • 2 days America’s Multi-Front Meltdown
  • 3 days Gold Up As U.S. Civil Unrest Escalates
  • 3 days How BlackRock Became King Of ESG Investing
  • 3 days Americans Don’t Care if TikTok Is A Security Threat
  • 5 days What’s Next In The Trump vs. Twitter Drama?
  • 6 days Escalating Tensions Could Crush $52 Billion China-U.S. Energy Deal
  • 6 days The Fed Is Printing Money At Unprecedented Levels
  • 6 days How Is The Real Estate Market Handling COVID-19?
  • 6 days Gold Flat As Markets Await Fed Chair Speech
  • 7 days What Is Day Trading And Is It Right For You?
  • 7 days Energy CEOs See Big Payouts Despite Oil Price Crash
  • 7 days Saudi Arabia Is Fighting A War On Two Fronts
  • 7 days 40 Million Jobless As Pandemic Fuels Economic Collapse
  • 7 days What Do India's Latest Reforms Mean For Its Coal Industry?
  • 7 days Copper Glut Continues To Grow
Saudi Arabia Is Fighting A War On Two Fronts

Saudi Arabia Is Fighting A War On Two Fronts

Short on funds and allies,…

Bill Gates And Big Oil Chase The Dream Of Nuclear Fusion

Bill Gates And Big Oil Chase The Dream Of Nuclear Fusion

Nuclear fusion is attracting more…

What's Next For Hong Kong?

What's Next For Hong Kong?

Many view tiny Hong Kong…

Damir Kaletovic

Damir Kaletovic

Writer, Safehaven.com

Damir Kaletovic is an award-winning investigative journalist, documentary filmmaker and expert on Southeastern Europe whose work appears on behalf of Safehaven.com.

Contact Author

  1. Home
  2. News
  3. Breaking News

The Changing Demographics Of Higher Education

University

Women beat men in all degree categories of higher education, and they have for decades—and worldwide. Men, it seems are slowing enrollment at an alarming rate, and young women are driving the change.

While men once outnumbered women in terms of collection enrollment by as much as 58 percent to 42 percent in the 1970s, the ratio has now almost reversed.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, women comprised more than 56 percent of students on campuses nationwide last year. That same year, about 2.2 million fewer men than women were enrolled in college.

And it’s a trend that shows no sign of veering off course. The National Center for Education Statistics also estimates that 57 percent of college students will be women by 2026.

So who is the new minority in higher educations? Hello, Men—welcome to a brand new world.  

According to U.S. Census Bureau data for 2017, women between ages 18 and 24 earned more than two-thirds of all master's degrees. Put in other terms, there were 167 women with master's degrees for every 100 men. In fact, women have held the Master’s Degree advantage in the U.S. since 1981.

Regarding professional degrees, women in the same age were handed three-quarters of professional degrees and 80 percent of doctoral degrees.

(Click to enlarge)

Source: Bloomberg

Another research study confirms the trend. In 2017, about 34.6 percent of women graduated college or obtained a higher educational degree. Compared to 1940, more than 8 times more women have attended college and nearly 6 times more men have in 2017. Related: Consumers Show ‘Extraordinary’ Shift In Sentiment

Women are gaining in educational attainment, and now we’re seeing the effects in the work force, too. A Pew Research Center report shows that among adults ages 25 to 64, women are now more likely than men to have a four-year college degree. In 2017, 38 percent of these women and 33 percent of men had a bachelor’s degree.

Women are also outpacing men in postgraduate education. In 2017, 14 percent of women ages 25 to 64 had an advanced degree, compared with 12 percent of men. That compares with 1992, when 9 percent of men and 6 percent of women in this age group had advanced degrees.

(Click to enlarge)

Source: Pew Research Center

So, why the shift? Women have taken on higher expectations, particularly in relation to their planned contributions to the country’s workforce. That means careers—and not just ‘jobs’.

Related: Uber Falling Victim to Investors’ Short-Term Thinking

That’s also changed when women want to get married.

According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, from the 1950s to the early 1970s, women tended to marry just over a year after graduation from college. Later in the 70s, that age increased by about 2.5 years. By 1981, 25 was the median age of marriage for college-educated women. That means more serious students, and the increasing availability of the contraceptive pills helped, too, as did a long fight against job discrimination.

It’s not 1950 anymore, but “the jury is still out concerning whether the full lifetime economic returns to college are greater for women than for men," according to the report’s authors.

By Damir Kaletovic for Safehaven.com

More Top Reads From Safehaven.com

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment