• 139 days Could Crypto Overtake Traditional Investment?
  • 144 days Americans Still Quitting Jobs At Record Pace
  • 146 days FinTech Startups Tapping VC Money for ‘Immigrant Banking’
  • 149 days Is The Dollar Too Strong?
  • 149 days Big Tech Disappoints Investors on Earnings Calls
  • 150 days Fear And Celebration On Twitter as Musk Takes The Reins
  • 152 days China Is Quietly Trying To Distance Itself From Russia
  • 152 days Tech and Internet Giants’ Earnings In Focus After Netflix’s Stinker
  • 156 days Crypto Investors Won Big In 2021
  • 156 days The ‘Metaverse’ Economy Could be Worth $13 Trillion By 2030
  • 157 days Food Prices Are Skyrocketing As Putin’s War Persists
  • 159 days Pentagon Resignations Illustrate Our ‘Commercial’ Defense Dilemma
  • 160 days US Banks Shrug off Nearly $15 Billion In Russian Write-Offs
  • 163 days Cannabis Stocks in Holding Pattern Despite Positive Momentum
  • 164 days Is Musk A Bastion Of Free Speech Or Will His Absolutist Stance Backfire?
  • 164 days Two ETFs That Could Hedge Against Extreme Market Volatility
  • 166 days Are NFTs About To Take Over Gaming?
  • 167 days Europe’s Economy Is On The Brink As Putin’s War Escalates
  • 170 days What’s Causing Inflation In The United States?
  • 171 days Intel Joins Russian Exodus as Chip Shortage Digs In
Ocean Power: The Missing Link

Ocean Power: The Missing Link

Wave energy has the potential…

Who Will Pay For The $40 Trillion Energy Transition?

Who Will Pay For The $40 Trillion Energy Transition?

All the pledges from government…

Mining.com

Mining.com

Mining.com

MINING.com is a web-based global mining publication focusing on news and commentary about mining and mineral exploration. The site is a one-stop-shop for mining industry…

Contact Author

  1. Home
  2. Commodities
  3. Energy

Britain Crosses Key Energy Landmark

Coal

Britain is about to pass a significant landmark — at midnight on Wednesday it will have gone two full months without using electricity from coal fired power stations for the first time since the industrial revolution.

The new record, the country’s National Grid said, is partly a result of the coronavirus pandemic. The halting of manufacturing and increased levels of home-working has seen demand for electricity drop by an average of 15% to 20%.

It also comes as renewables have contributed more than ever to the power-mix. During a record-breaking May, those power sources accounted for 28% of all energy production, on average.

Solar and wind produced 11.45% and 15.87% of Britain’s energy last month, respectively, while hydro added a further 0.69%. 

Eco-friendly biomass energy production contributed a further 8.75%. Nuclear, which produces no greenhouse emissions, churned out almost 23% of all energy.  

The biggest single contributor, however, was natural gas, with 30.06% of total output from this source. While natural gas is a fossil fuel, it produces about 50% fewer greenhouse gases than coal.

No coal plants by 2024

A decade ago, coal accounted for more than 40% of Britain’s energy production over the course of the year, according to data from Drax Electric Insights.

The country plans to close coal plants by 2024 as part of efforts to reach its net zero emissions goal by 2050.

The first coal-free day in Britain was recorded in 2017. Until this month’s record, the previous longest period without coal was in May 2019, when coal power contributed nothing to the grid for two weeks.

Britain goes two months without power from coal plants
Source: IEA’s Global Energy Outlook.

Britain’s energy consumption pattern is part of a global trend. The International Energy Agency’s 2019 World Energy Balances data set shows that coal continues to make up one the largest components of global energy consumption, with 28% of the total. Oil remains at the top, with 32%, followed by natural gas (22%), biofuels (9%), nuclear (5%), hydro (2%) and wind and solar (1%).

The agency also expects fast global growth in natural gas and renewable power generation – including a fivefold increase in solar and threefold increase in wind power consumption by 2040.

By Mining.com

More Top Reads From Safehaven.com:

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment