• 15 hours TikTok Takes Center Stage In US-China Tech War
  • 23 hours Are Semiconductor Stocks Overvalued?
  • 2 days Jobs Report Doesn’t Say Much Amid COVID Uncertainty
  • 2 days Crypto FOMO Heats Up As Bitcoin Climbs Above $11,000
  • 3 days Aluminum Is Bouncing Back In China
  • 3 days The Deep-Sea Mining Debate
  • 4 days Markets Trending Down Despite Tech Blow-Out
  • 4 days Big Oil Battered On Dismal Earnings
  • 5 days Russian Billionaire Bails On Mid-Sized Gold Miner
  • 5 days Gold Stocks Gear Up For A Big Autumn
  • 6 days America Is Looking To Bring Nuclear Power To Space
  • 6 days What Is Behind Gold's Astonishing Rally?
  • 7 days Stocks Tumble On Brutal Economic Report
  • 7 days Kodak Soars By 400% After Trump Bump
  • 8 days U.S. Coal Production Falls To 42 Year Lows
  • 8 days Indonesia Moves To Bolster Mining Sector
  • 9 days The U.S. Dollar Is Losing Ground As A Reserve Currency
  • 9 days Gold Prices Soar To Record Highs As Dollar Dips
  • 10 days Republicans Unveil Stimulus 2.0
  • 10 days Big Oil Is Back On The M&A Game
Trump Tweet Sends Oil Soaring 25%

Trump Tweet Sends Oil Soaring 25%

Oil prices spiked on Thursday…

The Most Exciting Oil Plays Of 2020

The Most Exciting Oil Plays Of 2020

As the United States shale…

Three Energy Casualties In The Coronavirus Crisis

Three Energy Casualties In The Coronavirus Crisis

Energy markets are reeling from…

Oilprice.com

Oilprice.com

Writer, OilPrice.com

Information/Articles and Prices on a wide range of commodities: We have assembled a team of experienced writers to provide you with information on Crude Oil,…

Contact Author

  1. Home
  2. Commodities
  3. Energy

U.S. Coal Production Falls To 42 Year Lows

Coal

U.S. coal production fell another 7% in 2019—the lowest amount of coal produced in the United States since 1978, during the national coal miners' strike, according to the Energy Information Agency (EIA).

And it is set to fall even further in 2020 as the international appetite for coal has waned with the pandemic.

U.S. coal production totaled 706 million short tones in 2019, compared to 756 million short tons in the year prior.

 

This year is shaping up to be even worse for coal, as production is expected to dip to levels not seen since the '60s.

Wyoming, the largest coal-producing state in the U.S., saw a 9% dip in 2019, accounting for most of the production decrease. West Virginia, the States' second-largest coal producer, only saw a 2% decrease last year, according to EIA data.

Arizona stopped its coal production late last year, while Kansas and Arkansas stopped production in 2017 and 2018 respectively, shortening the list of states that produce the energy source that is now looked upon most unfavorably, even among the not-terribly-climate-conscious crowd. Related: How Are Low Car Sales Impacting The Metals Market?

For 2020, the EIA's outlook on coal production in the U.S. is grim, with the agency expecting another annual loss of 29%. The EIA uses railcar loading data to estimate production, which as of July 18, were 27.1% off compared to the same period last year.

The anticipated dip this year is primarily due to a fall in U.S. coal exports, which were 29% off as of May, compared to the same five months in 2019.

But coal shouldn't be counted out just yet. Coal production increased for the week ending July 18, and the EIA is expecting coal production in the States to rebound 7% next year, as natural gas prices are expected to rise. This will make coal-fired electric power plants more price competitive with its "cleaner" competitor.

By Julianne Geiger for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Safehaven.com:

Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment